bottle bottoms

by Jennifer
(pa, usa)


Found this in Atlantic City also - only thing we can make out is an "81" on the bottom; kind of an oddly-shaped, thick bottle.


Any ideas what this may be/where this is from? Thanks!

Comments for bottle bottoms

Click here to add your own comments

Dec 13, 2013
Sea Roamer
by: Bob

I found a piece this morning walking the shore in Hull, MA as the snow commences.

The piece appears to be the bottom of a bottle. The glass has the letter " I " stamped into the piece.

Very worn, very smooth piece. Brown in color.

Curious about the imprinted stamp.

Barely visible, however scrutiny reveals the stamp.

Any ideas out there?

Mar 20, 2011
Similar piece - sea glass bottle bottom
by: Diana

I just found a similar piece yesterday on Cape Cod. It is so heavy and think that I was astounded. I have never found a piece this big before. Mine is clear. Nice find.

Nov 17, 2010
nice catch!
by: Laury

I find bottle bottoms like this one ALOT. They seem to be plentiful on the Atlantic City beaches on which I like to hunt. I usually find white, but I also have a beautilful amethsyst and gorgeous blues.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Identify Your Sea Glass.

bottle bottoms

by jennifer
(pa, usa)


Found this bottle bottom in Atlantic City with an "A" on the bottom.

Any ideas what/where this is from? Thanks!

Comments for bottle bottoms

Click here to add your own comments

Jun 23, 2018
A
by: Cathy

I found an "A" bottle bottom in Avalon, NJ. That’s 2 within 30 miles! Where are they from?


Hi Cathy, here are some possibilities as shown on the website https://www.glassbottlemarks.com/bottlemarks/


  • A…………………The letter "A" is sometimes merely a mold letter (identifying a particular mold used by a glass factory). If it is an abbreviation for a glass factory, it could stand for one of several companies. One possibility: Agnew & Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (c.1854-1894+). See "A & CO." mark. Another possibility would be Adams & Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (1861-1891). Originally Adams, Macklin & Company (1851-1861), they did manufacture at least one type of fruit jar circa 1866, lettered "Adams & Co./Manufacturers/Pittsburgh,Pa." on the front. However, the great bulk of their glass production seems to have been pressed pattern glass and high-quality tableware and novelties, especially throughout the later years of their operation. In 1891, they joined the merger known as the United States Glass Company. Note: If the bottle is machine-made, the letter "A" would indicate a much more recent company, perhaps Arkansas Glass Container Corporation, Jonesboro, Arkansas (1948-to date). See "A.G.C. in state of Arkansas".
  • A (stylized triangle with "A" as central motif)………….Arkansas Glass Container Corporation (Arkansas Glass), Jonesboro, Arkansas (1948-to date).  I am not positive this mark has actually been used on containers. It has been displayed on their website. If you have up-to-date information on this mark, please contact me!
  • A & CO…………Adams & Company, Pittsburgh, PA (1861-1891) and/or  Agnew & Company, also of Pittsburgh (c.1854-1894+).   1) Adams & Company is considered as the most likely producer of several "Clasped Hands" figured flasks from the 1860s bearing this mark on the front,  as attributed by Jay Hawkins, researcher on early Pittsburgh glassmakers.  If so, they were produced in the early years of that company before they began to concentrate (primarily) on pattern glass tableware.   2) In reference to Agnew & Company, there was a series of glass companies in the Pittsburgh area in which the Agnew family was involved, beginning as early as 1842 with Chambers & Agnew. Later, approximately 1854, the firm became John Agnew & Company (1854-1870); then, John Agnew & Son (1871-1876) and later simply Agnew & Company (1876-1892+). The most recent incarnation seems to have been "The Agnew Company", which was in operation in 1894 (a bottle catalog from this company exists, dated 1894) which may have continued on for some time afterwards. Jars that are marked "JOHN AGNEW & SON / PITTSBURG PA" presumably date from about 1871 to 1876, and those marked "AGNEW & CO / PITTSBURG PA" would date from c. 1876 into the early 1890s.  Also, please see "A"  and "Agnew & Co". entries.
  • A in a circle………Armstrong Cork Company (Glass Division), Lancaster, Pennsylvania; Millville, New Jersey [former Whitall Tatum Co. plant] ; Dunkirk, Indiana [former Hart Glass Mnfg Co. plant]. Mark was used from 1938-1969 on bottles and insulators. If there is a line underneath the "circled A", this indicates the bottle was produced at the Dunkirk plant.

Jan 30, 2011
Embossed Letter Bottoms
by: Anonymous

Old milk bottles often had huge embossed letters on the bottom of the bottle. I believe each dairy had a different letter.

Dec 30, 2010
Found this page, too, about letters on bottles
by: K. Johnson

A.....................The letter "A" is often merely a mold letter. If it is an abbreviation for a glass factory, it could stand for one of several companies. One possibility: Agnew & Company, Pittsburgh, PA (c.1854-1894+). See "A & CO." mark. Another possibility would be Adams & Company, Pittsburgh, PA (1861-1891). Originally Adams, Macklin & Company (1851-1861), they did manufacture at least one type of fruit jar circa 1866, lettered "Adams & Co./Manufacturers/Pittsburgh,Pa." on the front. However, the great bulk of their glass production seems to have been pressed pattern glass and high-quality tableware and novelties, especially throughout the later years of their operation. In 1891, they joined the merger known as the United States Glass Company. Note: If the bottle is machine-made, the letter "A" would indicate a much more recent company, perhaps Arkansas Glass Container Corporation, Jonesboro, AR (1958-to date).

Nov 20, 2010
Try this web-site
by: Anonymous

Hi,
Try this web-site for information regarding Bottle-Bottoms
http://www.antiquebottles.com/bottoms/

Good Luck!

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Identify Your Sea Glass.


OdysseySeaGlass relies on advertising to cover costs of sharing sea glass info from around the world. Purchasing from an ad on our site costs no more than directly and provides us with a few cents income.

You will see Google and Amazon ads as well a few other advertisers as you view our pages. .


Browse Our List of Recommended Sea Glass and Beach Books